Tag Archives: teeth

4 Things That Are Ruining Your Smile (And What To Do About Them)

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4 Things That Are Ruining Your Smile (And What To Do About Them)

Although we get two sets during our lifetime, it is still important that we take good care of our teeth. Indeed, without the proper care, we can expect to encounter all sorts of problems from bad breath to infection and tooth loss. The good news is that by identifying the things that can harm our teeth, we can make sure we take steps to avoid or counter them. Keep reading to find out what the most common smile ruining things are below:

Too much sugar:

It tastes great but too much sugar is very bad news for your teeth. This is because it encourages tartar to form which can lead to painful and unsightly gum disease, otherwise known as gingivitis. That’s not the half of it, either, because sugar also combines with the bacteria we all have in our mouths to cause plaque, this is the stuff that erodes tooth enamel and leaves your teeth vulnerable to decay!

Fortunately, there are some tactics you can use to combat the effects of too much sugar on your smile. The first is to try and reduce the amount of sugar that you eat, limiting items like candy, cakes, and sodas. Next, if you do eat something sugary, brushing your teeth right after can help remove excess sugar from the mouth and minimize the effect.

Smoking:

Another thing that can wreak havoc with your smile is smoking. Of course, it’s also disastrous for your health, so there are many reasons to quit as soon as possible. In particular, smoking is known to yellow the teeth and can turn an already unsightly plaque to a nasty brown color. Once again quitting is the best course of action here. Although, as a short-term measure, regular teeth cleaning at the dentist, as well as specialized toothpaste designed for smokers can help.

Putting off going to the dentist:

While we are on the subject of dentists, putting off your appointment can severely impact your smile too. Unfortunately, there are many reasons why people may not go to the dentist as often as they should such as anxiety and embarrassment that they haven’t taken care of their oral health in the right way.

Of course, the longer that you leave between appointments the more damage you are likely to do to your smile. You can make regular dental appointments a great deal easier for yourself by finding a good dentist, one that is friendly and non-judgmental. Many dental practices even specialize in helping particularly anxious patients now, which can make the whole experience much easier.

Grinding your teeth:

Last of all, you may be ruining your smile by grinding your teeth. Teeth grinding is when a person unconsciously forces their jaw together in a slight chewing motion and can be linked to stress. The problem with teeth grinding is that it can put far too much pressure on each tooth and make them much more likely to crack and wear away, something that can be both painful and unsightly.

To counter teeth grinding and improve your smile it may be useful to wear a mouth guard at night. Also, finding some ways that are effective for reducing stress may help you minimize this habit and save your smile.

Improve your smile with the tips above and flash those pearly whites!

Quick Tips For An Even Better Smile

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Quick Tips For An Even Better Smile

Your smile is one of the first things that people notice about you. A lot of people worry about how their smile looks, especially in photographs. If you’re worried about yours, try these tips for an even better smile that is healthier too:

Floss daily:

Flossing gets rid of plaque from between your teeth and out from under your gum line, where your toothbrush doesn’t reach. Flossing makes you less likely to suffer from tooth decay and gingivitis. Without flossing, tartar builds up under the surface of your gum lines, which can lead to periodontal disease. This causes bone destruction and tooth loss. To floss properly, wrap the floss around your finger and slide it into the gap between your teeth. Slide the floss gently up and down under the gum line two or three times. If you don’t like the feeling of flossing, you can use an oral irrigater instead. These spray water between your teeth to remove plaque and food without the need for floss.

See your dentist twice a year:

A professional cleaning every six months is a great way to maintain a gorgeous smile by keeping it healthy. If you don’t get a regular cleaning from a dentist, you could have an increased risk of periodontal disease. This causes swollen, receding, and bleeding gums, which is uncomfortable and unattractive. It is also linked to a greater risk of conditions including heart attack, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and sleep apnea. A good cleaning will remove stain and tartar. A regular trip to your dentist also means they can screen for other health conditions. Many health conditions have early signs that show in the mouth, so your dentist or hygienist can catch many problems very early that you can then follow up with your doctor. Your dentist can also advise you on solutions for your smile like whitening, braces, or Freedom Mini Dental Implants.

Limit tea, coffee, and red wine:

Drinks like coffee, tea, and red wine are all known for staining your teeth. They can build up a superficial stain that your dentist will be able to polish away for you, but they could also cause much deeper staining of the tooth enamel that is much harder to remove. Drinking these drinks through a straw can help to reduce the risk of staining, and can also reduce the likelihood of tooth decay. Rinse your mouth with water after drinking anything like this so the dark liquid won’t stay on the teeth, and have a chance to stain.

Buy a quality toothbrush:

Electric toothbrushes remove more plaque and give you healthier gums than manual toothbrushes. If nothing else, buy a manual brush that has soft bristles. Bristles that are too stiff and brushing too hard can cause your gums to recede and will wear down the enamel from your teeth. Use a soft-bristled brush, and brush gently to avoid damaging your teeth by accident.

Ready, set, smile!

Featured Image By: Unsplash

Know About Cigarettes & Your Teeth

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Know About Cigarettes & Your Teeth

It is well known that smoking not only negatively affects your physical health but your oral health too. According to the American Lung Association, approximately more than 7000 chemicals mixed with nicotine are found in tobacco. It’s difficult to stop due to the addictive qualities nicotine has on people, along with the withdrawal symptoms caused. However, the adverse effects are far worse long-term for your oral health, as gum disease, tooth loss, oral cancer, and halitosis are some of the many risks to look out for. Keep reading for a better understanding on these:

Gum Disease:

Gum disease or gingivitis, which could possibly lead to periodontitis, can be caused by smoking. The build-up of plaque on the teeth, which could then harden to tartar, is increased bacteria buildup, creating red, inflamed, and bleeding gums that could develop into an infection. Smoking hinders the healing process, and if left unchecked, the issues could lead to tooth loss. There are multiple symptoms and risk factors, but it’s essential to check it out with your dentist if you see red flag signs. It is crucial to prevent the effects from getting worse over time.

Oral Effects of Smoking:

The adverse effects of smoking lead to tooth decay, teeth discoloration, and bad breath (halitosis) caused by the build-up of tar and nicotine. With this, your sense of taste begins to decrease along with your appetite. Nicotine, when combined with oxygen, is known to cause discoloration. The tar build-up leaves behind yellow or black discoloration on the teeth and an intense build-up on the tongue called the smoker’s tongue. These are a combination of adverse effects caused by the ingredients being absorbed in the mouth.

Prevention & Treatment For Gum Disease and Oral Health:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day
  • Mouth Wash
  • Floss every day
  • See a dentist regularly
  • Deep cleaning
  • Medications (if treatment is needed)
  • Quit smoking

Risk of Oral Cancer:

According to the WHO, smoking leads to multiple forms of cancer and accounts for 90% of them, including oral cancer. It is known to weaken the immune system and make healing harder. If you have regular checkups with your dentist, such as Summer Creek Dental, you can detect the symptoms in their early stages. An oral cancer screening is highly recommended for smokers as 27% of deaths recorded in Europe in 2018 have been positively linked to smoking. Mouth cancer is likely to be developed in the tongue, lips, and throat.

If you can quit smoking, it has been found that the build of bacteria decreases, and your sense of taste and smell start to return. Your mouth can be restored once you quit with your practitioner’s help, which will most likely bring back a bright smile and a better mood. If leaving isn’t entirely on the cards yet, it’s essential to take extra care of your oral health and regularly assist in prevention.

Featured Image By: Pexels

How To Help Your Child Get Over A Fear Of The Dentist

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How To Help Your Child Get Over A Fear Of The Dentist

You know that going to the dentist is very important for your oral health, but children often feel scared of the dentist, and it can be hard to get them to go. It’s common to feel nervous before the dentist, however, a serious fear of the dentist could stop your children from looking after their teeth properly in later life. How can you help them to overcome their fear? Read on to find out more:

Find The Right Dentist:

There are dentists who specialize in treating fearful patients, so look for them, or see a family dentist like ÉLAN Dentistry who is used to nervous children. These dentists take extra care to make their office seem less scary. This might mean using soothing photography or music, instead of displaying dental care posters. Sometimes the dentist themselves will dress in more casual clothing instead of scrubs. The sights, sounds, and smells of a typical dentist’s office can be frightening, so removing those triggers can help a lot. Look for a dentist who understands and will work around your child’s fear.

Talk To Them:

Make sure your child understands what will happen while they’re at the dentist. Talk to them about their appointment and explain what will happen (in as non-scary a way as you can manage), so they know what to expect. If they know what will happen, this can make the appointment less scary for them. Ask the dentist to explain what they’re doing throughout the appointment too, so your child isn’t surprised by something they didn’t know would happen.

Distract Them:

Look for distractions while your child is in the dentist’s chair. Take some headphones for them and let them listen to music or an audiobook. Find a dentist who has a TV for patients to watch in the chair and put on one of their favorite shows.

Try relaxation techniques:

Controlled breathing can work well. Get your child to take a deep breath, hold it in, then let it out very slowly. This slows the heartbeat and relaxes the muscles. You could also get them to try progressive muscle relaxation, which is when you tense and relax different muscle groups in succession to ease tension.

See the dentist at a less busy time:

There will be fewer people there, so less chance of hearing the noise of dental tools from other rooms. Your dentist is also more likely to have more time to ease your child’s fears and let them take small breaks than they will at busier times when they might be running behind on their appointments. The later you go in the day, the more time your child has to let their fears build up too.

Get Help:

If your child’s fear is becoming a phobia, then it might be worth having them speak with a therapist. Treating a dentist phobia is much like other any other, and is often helped by direct therapeutic exposure. This means your child will be introduced to feared items, such as dental tools, in a controlled, gradual, non-threatening manner.

As mentioned above, being nervous to go to the dentist is completely normal. If your child is fearful of the dentist, try any of the above tips before their next cleaning!

Featured Image By: Unsplash

How To Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy

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How To Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy

Children are vulnerable to most dental infections. Even though dentistry services have advanced recently due to technology, parents still have to play active roles to improve their dental health and that of their little ones. Oral health is essential because untreated dental conditions have been associated with diabetes, stroke, and heart diseases in adults. Also referred to as dental caries, tooth decay affects kids and adults. Thankfully, these are largely preventable with good practices. Here are a few tips to promote your child’s dental health:

Start caring for dental health as soon as possible:

By the age of 6 months, you may want to stop your baby from taking breast milk or formula at night. It has been thought that late night breastfeeding increases the risk of tooth decay in kids due to the lactose content (milk sugar). By 1-year-old, your child needs to have access to dental care services and be examined by dentists every three to six months. Dental services for families may differ and may include consulting pediatric dentists. Parents who live in the Lehi, Utah area may find Dry Creek Pediatric Dentistry services very helpful for their infants and children.

Stick to a healthy diet:

Being mindful of your child’s diet is one way to ensure that they don’t eat foods that increase their risks of getting cavities. The rule of thumb is that any food or drink with high sugar content is potentially unhealthy for their dental health. When your child eats more carbs, they will have a higher tendency to develop cavities.

Let your children taste the natural sweetness of fruits instead – that is way healthier than giving them too much candy. Discourage your little ones from eating a lot of snacks and soda pop. These not only could expose them to obesity; the mixture of sugar and acid could break down their teeth. The same is valid for juice – it’s another form of soda pop with no carbonation.

Give kids fluoride:

Routine application of fluoride hardens the enamel, making it difficult for acid to penetrate the teeth. While some town water supply systems are fluoridated, others are not. If that is the case in your community, you can ask your dentist to recommend fluoride supplements for you and your family. The majority of toothpaste on the market contains fluoride, but that alone is not enough to protect your child’s teeth.

Having said that too, excessive amounts of fluoride can lead to tooth discoloration. Always consult your dentists before giving supplements to your kids. During your children’s annual dental exam, dentists may apply fluoride varnish to their teeth. This topical fluoride helps prevent and heal early cavities.

When your child starts to develop permanent teeth, your dentist may apply a thin wash of resin (sealant) to the back of their teeth where chewing occurs. This coating prevents tooth decay by stopping bacteria from settling in the crevices of the molars. Finally, understand that regular flossing and brushing are essential to good dental hygiene.

A good understanding of dental care that is taught early on in your child’s life is so important and will help them to be proactive in better protecting their teeth.

Featured Image By: Pixabay

4 “Minor” Health Issues That Could Actually Be Major

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4 “Minor” Health Issues That Could Actually Be Major

We’re all a little guilty of ignoring new health symptoms, especially if they seem fairly minor in nature. We think that we can treat them ourselves or that they’ll go away on their own as long as we don’t do anything to make them worse, and most of the time that may be the case. However, there are numerous “minor” health issues that could actually be more serious than you think. Let’s take a look at them now:

Constipation:

Constipation can be uncomfortable, but it can also be embarrassing, which is why most of us try to deal with it ourselves by taking a little senna or adding more fiber to our diets. Most of the time that’s all that’s needed. But, if you are suffering from constipation that is both prolonged and painful, it could be another story altogether. Persistent constipation can lead to hemorrhoids and even confusion, especially in older people. It could also be a symptom of bowel cancer or an intestinal blockage, so you really should seek the advice of your doctor if you are experiencing constipation over a period of time.

Gum boils:

If you start to notice boils or sores on your gums, you may naturally just pop to the chemist for some ointment to soothe and cure the problem. Again, that may be all that’s needed, but if you get a lot of sores and boils or if they become infected, it could be a sign of something more serious like gum disease. You should make an appointment with a dental practice like Rivers Edge Dental as soon as possible. If it’s caught early enough, gum disease can be reversed, and if that is not possible, it can be managed so that it doesn’t get worse. If you notice any oral health issues, you should not wait to seek help.

Feeling down:

If you’re feeling blue, you’re uninterested in doing much, and you’re more tired than usual, it could be more than simply feeling down, you could be depressed. Depression is really serious and the sooner you seek help for it and get the right treatment, the more likely you are to get back to your old self and start feeling good again. Not only that, but depression can also be a symptom of several serious physical illnesses including M.E, and even cancer in some cases, so it really does need to be explored.

Pexels

Accidentally peeing:

You might think that accidentally peeing a little when you laugh or cough is no big deal in terms of your health, but it could actually be a sign that there is a problem with your pelvic floor, for example, and there are things you can do about that. So, there is no need to suffer in silence – go and see your doctor and see what can be recommended for you.

They may seem minor, but if you experience any of these symptoms, seeing a medical professional is a good idea.

Featured Image By: Pexels

Nothing To Smile About! The Risks Of Poor Oral Hygiene

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Nothing To Smile About! The Risks Of Poor Oral Hygiene

When we are looking to optimize our health with the right practices, we may not necessarily give as much attention to our oral health as we should. While we all know the importance of flossing and brushing our teeth, the reality is that if we do not look after our teeth properly, it could set us up for more problems down the line. If we have poor oral health, we will experience toothache, bleeding gums, and bad breath, but if we neglect our oral health, we could end up with one or more of the following conditions:

Cardiovascular Disease:

If the gums are inflamed, the risk of bacteria getting into the bloodstream increases. There are many reasons that your teeth could allow bacteria into the bloodstream, even if you brush them properly. Misaligned teeth may hide a number of germs that you are not able to access. Furthermore, wisdom teeth that hide underneath the gum could also harbor bacteria. In order to prevent any form of the disease, cardiovascular or gum, proper oral hygiene is crucial. A winning combination of regular trips to the dentist, while also aligning your teeth with products like Invisalign or braces make sure that any hidden debris that is hard to access is greatly minimized.

Respiratory Infections:

Surprisingly, poor oral health can result in issues in the respiratory system. This is because any bacteria that stays in the mouth from infected teeth or swollen gums could be breathed into the lungs or travel to the lungs through the bloodstream. Bacteria in the lungs could cause breathing issues such as respiratory infections, COPD, and bronchitis.

Kidney Disease:

Chronic kidney disease can cause havoc with blood pressure and affect the bones and heart. People with gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, can have weaker immune systems, which give them a higher likelihood of getting infections. People can potentially experience kidney disease if they suffer from poor oral health.

Diabetes:

While diabetics are more susceptible to infections, such as infected gums, it can work the other way. Periodontal disease can make diabetes more difficult to keep under control. People with diabetes have fluctuating blood sugar levels, which can be a direct cause of gum disease. Gum disease can cause higher than normal blood sugar levels, therefore, a person with poor oral health is at a higher risk of getting diabetes. However, this can be mitigated by having a healthy diet.

There’s a lot of risks associated with poor oral hygiene, including rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer. The best way to prevent any serious issues resulting from bad oral health is to practice good oral hygiene. It is all about simple things, including brushing the teeth for at least two minutes twice a day, avoiding tobacco products, as well as flossing. Healthy gums are, in many ways, a window to your general health. While it’s important to maintain good health practices, we also need to be aware of the risks of poor oral hygiene too.

Featured Image By: Pixabay

Tooth Glow Gem Kit Review

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Tooth Glow Gem Kit Review

Hello! A year or so ago, my cousin applied tooth gems to my pearly whites during a visit to her salon in Pittsburgh. Within a few weeks, one of the two gems fell off. The other one, however, managed to stay on until just about a month or so ago. I absolutely adored my tooth gems and I missed my smile without them so I purchased a few Swarovski crystal kits off of a site called Tooth Glow.

The crystals I picked out were lovely, light pink and a multi colored opal and the application process looked promising, so I was very eager to get my package in the mail. After what seemed like an eternity (AKA over three weeks, lol.), my Tooth Glow kits arrived and I applied them the same night.

Bear in mind, there was still bonding on my teeth when I took the selfie – it looks a lot better now, I swear:

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The application process for the tooth gems was really easy. First, I put some petroleum jelly on wax paper and used it to stick a gem to a cotton swab. After that, I mixed up a bonding type of concoction that looked similar to what braces are applied with. Then, I brushed the spot I wanted bedazzled on my tooth heavily with the bonding agent.

Once the bonding was on, it was essential to move quickly and get the gem on before it dried. This was a little stressful and I failed the first time. But, I succeeded the second and third time around and I am really pleased with the outcome! It’s nice to have some sparkly bling back in my smile and I would recommend the Tooth Glow kits, easily.

One tiny qualm, though. I was only given one packet of the bonding agent when I bought two gem kits. I’m a little peeved about that but it is still a purchase that I’m glad I made!

Have you been successful at doing DIY salon treatments? Or not so much? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

Happy (Early) Birthday Present To Me

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Happy (Early) Birthday Present To Me

Hello! If you follow me on Facebook (at Sarah Mushenheim), then you will have seen my musing that I officially feel like a grown up because I asked my parents for an electric toothbrush for my twenty-sixth birthday. After a visit to the dentist, we both agreed that I could benefit from an electric toothbrush and I planned on ordering one off of Amazon once I got home…

But, then, I remembered it is almost my birthday (on the seventh) and it couldn’t hurt to ask. My mom kindly offered for me to pick out an electric toothbrush for my big 2-6 and, thanks to my boyfriend being an amazing sport: IT’S PINK! Check it out:

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My boyfriend, Johnny, and I have wanted an electric toothbrush for a while and after using it one time, I have no idea what we were waiting for! We both agreed that our teeth have never felt cleaner after an at home brushing before and I know that my dentist will be pleased with the results of this here Philips electric toothbrush.

Not only does this model leave my teeth feeling literally Arctic Fresh but it is so adorable I can hardly stand it. Why would I want a blue or white toothbrush when I can have the sweetest cotton candy pink?! It was also a great deal on Amazon, as you could get the toothbrush and a replaceable brush head set as a bundle. #SCORE

Is an electric toothbrush the most exciting birthday gift? Actually, YES. Johnny and I love it, I love the color, and it was exactly what I wanted. So here’s to turning twenty-six with better teeth, I guess?! 😀

How did you celebrate your last birthday? Have you made the change from a regular to electric toothbrush? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

Facing Your Fears: A Memoir

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Facing Your Fears: A Memoir

Hi! For those of you who recall, around this time last year I was suffering through a recovery from an oral surgery gone severely wrong. For those of you who don’t recall, I had an oral surgery last year that went severely wrong, which you can read about on the provided link! I have always been wary about the dental arts and, after such a traumatic experience, the last thing I wanted was any more people poking around in my mouth with sharp objects.

Unfortunately, things didn’t pan out the way I hoped, which was never having to go to a dentist or oral surgeon again. Especially because the surgery I had last year left me with some lingering problems that needed corrected. And, especially because I turn twenty-six this year, these issues needed sorted out ASAP before I get off my mom and dad’s insurance.

So, with a heaping dose of anxiety, I made my way to the periodontist who my mom recommended as a patient herself. After an exam, the decisions were made that 1) the doctor was very nice and 2) I would need to undergo a deep cleaning of my gums to help with the recession that was happening as well as the recession that became worse post surgery.

This past week, I had the first deep cleaning on the right half of my mouth and I would be a liar if I said I wasn’t freaking out. Last year, one bad procedure on my mouth left me drinking Ensure and out of work for a month and a half. However, I knew that all of this work had to be done so I bucked up and sat myself in the chair after announcing how nervous I was, of course.

In fact, I started crying as soon as the first numbing injection took place. Yes, I was being a baby but I just couldn’t help myself. I was traumatized by a quack of an oral surgeon and being back in an office to get work done on my mouth made a whole flood of scared emotions come out. But, I gritted my teeth metaphorically speaking because my mouth was open and had the doctor continue.

By the time the numbing kicked in, I literally couldn’t feel a thing and the doctor spent at least an hour cleaning the first half of my mouth (I’ll get the second half done this week). At the end of the procedure, my periodontist thanked me for trusting him because he knew how much I had suffered and how hard it was for me to allow someone to do that type of work on me.

I was so moved by this because I was downright embarrassed. No one wants to hear that they take poor care of their mouth and also no one wants to burst into tears as soon as a needle gets pulled out. I didn’t feel one ounce of shame after the doctor thanked me because he understood where I was coming from and didn’t take it lightly that I was even there to begin with.

After the procedure, I was a bit sore and nauseous but, within a few days, everything was back to normal. My mouth already feels infinitely better and, shockingly, I’m looking forward to getting the other half taken care of this week. The doctor helped restore my faith in those working in the field of dentistry and it also motivated me to continue taking the best care of my teeth as all of the problems I have begin to resolve.

I faced my fear in a big way and the risk was definitely worth the reward. Despite not feeling well post procedure, I felt proud of myself and strangely confident. I confronted one of my biggest fears head on and I came out on top. This is a lesson that I am going to always come back to in my life because sometimes taking a leap of faith pays off in the best way!

What are you afraid of? How did you confront that fear? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah