Tag Archives: dentist

Top Tips For Looking After Your Teeth

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Top Tips For Looking After Your Teeth

The ABCs of oral health is brushing, flossing, and rinsing, but they’re not the only measures to take. In order to achieve a sparkling smile, you should go beyond squeezing toothpaste out of the tube – you should get started with the tips below:

Visit The Dentist:

The reason you don’t see the dentist often is likely to be a dental phobia, financial constraints, or just plain neglect. Visit your dentist regularly (the ADA recommends twice a year), and you’ll detect problems like decay, gum disease, trauma, or cancer earlier when they are more manageable, not to mention easier and less expensive to deal with.

Recognize The Age:

Most parents tend to overlook the oral health needs of their toddlers and elderly relatives, but they require regular dental visits just as much as the rest of us. Before they’re coordinated enough to tie their own shoes, children should be seen by a dentist by the age of one. The elderly have their own oral health issues too. As people age, their saliva production decreases, resulting in more tooth decay and discomfort for people wearing dentures. Arthritis and dental decay can make brushing and flossing difficult.

Drink Less Soda:

Having an extra fizzy drink is fun, but it is also partly responsible for the bad effects soda has on our teeth. Carbonated soda contains phosphoric acid and citric acid, both of which act to erode the surface of your teeth. Even though one can or more of soda a day won’t harm your teeth, drinking more than one of them makes them more susceptible to cavities. You can add flavor to water by slicing citrus, crushing berries. or adding mint leaves.

Mind The Sugar:

Tooth decay is caused, in large, by sugar consumption. Plaque forms in your mouth and consumes your tooth enamel and gums as it fuels bacteria. When you indulge in sweetened coffee in the morning or ice cream at night, your pearly whites are bombarded with twenty minutes of acid production. Try cutting down on sugary treats and brushing and flossing every time you eat or snack to avoid being one of the twenty percent of Americans who suffer from tooth decay.

Use The Right Toothbrush:

It is best to use a brush with soft bristles. A brush this size should last for two to three months with proper care. Whenever you notice bent bristles, it’s time to replace it – but don’t wait too long. It is possible to damage the teeth and gums even if a straight bristle tip does not become rounded.

Practice Proper Technique:

While most people know that they should brush their teeth at least twice a day, a lot of people don’t bother thinking about how they should do it. Make gentle, short, circular motions with the toothbrush at a forty-five degree angle pointed toward the gum line. Be sure not to over brush each tooth. Over brushing damages teeth and erodes the gum line.

Good Flossing:

A healthy mouth and teeth are nurtured by flossing. It can cause friction and damage your gum line when you don’t floss properly, just like brushing. Keep about two inches between your fingers as you wrap floss around your index fingers. You can use an automatic flossing device to break up plaque and keep your gums healthy. If not, make sure that you unroll fresh floss for each tooth while keeping it tight against the tooth.

This guide should help you to look after your teeth and keep them healthy for bright, radiant smiles all of the time! 🙂

Featured Image By: George Becker from Pexels

Pikin’ & Grinnin’

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Pikin’ & Grinnin’

Hello! First of all, major props to whomever got the Hee Haw reference of this post title! Second of all, I have been absolutely loving the waterpik that I purchased after my visit to the periodontist last week. During my appointment, I was so pleased to learn that my dental problems had remained stable during my long stint of no check ups thanks to the pandemic. To continue improving the issues, I bought a waterpik as soon as I got home as per the recommendations of the professionals:

I am still getting used to using my new waterpik and literally every review I have read on them was right – it is very messy at first! I have had to resort to laying a bath towel around the sink because the water just gets everywhere. I know that these mini flash floods in my bathroom will come to a halt once I get better at using the waterpik, though, so that is not a deterrent in the slightest.

I also read on the reviews for the waterpik that I bought that it was incredibly noisy but I haven’t found that to be true at all. It has the noise you would expect from a product like this – nothing more, nothing less. Even if it were obnoxiously loud, you can’t beat the price of this waterpik (about seventy dollars) for how well it works and all of the different accessories that comes with it.

This waterpik included five different tips which will help in different ways:

  • Plaque seeker tip: This one needs no further explanation
  • Toothbrush tip: Neither does this one
  • Tongue cleaner tip: Or this one
  • Orthodontic tip: This one is good for people with braces
  • Pik pocket tip: This is the one that I use as it gets deep into the periodontal pockets for an intense clean

I have been using my waterpik with the pik pocket tip every morning and night and my gums have already started to feel better. They are not as tender and I feel them getting healthier with every use. Dare I say it, I am almost looking forward to my next appointments with my dentist and periodontist because this is going to improve my oral hygiene tenfold and I think that they are going to be proud! 😀

Do you use a waterpik? How do you feel about going to the dentist? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

Pearly Whites

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Pearly Whites

Hi! Ever since I had an oral surgery gone wrong close to three years ago, I have had a HUGE fear of the dentist. But, let’s be real, I’ve always been kind of afraid of it and instead of facing my fears, I just wouldn’t go. In the beginning of February 2020, I finally worked up the courage to see a periodontist and had a handful of appointments with him. Then, the worst of the pandemic hit and I hadn’t been back since.

Although I hadn’t been to see the periodontist, I worked hard to keep up my oral hygiene with an electric toothbrush and tried my best to at least keep my problems stable. However, going so long without having any type of check up brought me back to my ambivalence of ever returning. Which is why I am proud to say that I actually had my first appointment with my periodontist since the pandemic this past week! 😀

You guys have no idea how nervous I was for this appointment because of my phobia in general and I was extremely worried that my issues had worsened. Which is why I am even prouder to say that thanks to my improved oral hygiene, the problems that I went in for had remained stable!! My worst nightmare would have been hearing the professionals say “What happened?!” so to hear that I had been doing as good as I could have been was such a big relief.

While the issues with my gums are by no means great, I am so motivated to continue making it better after this appointment. I have cleanings scheduled with my regular dentist and my periodontist. I also purchased a waterpik as per their recommendation as soon as I returned home. I like to think that even if the appointment didn’t go well, I still would have done all of that but it would definitely have made it much scarier.

I was all but traumatized after my surgery gone wrong and I think anyone would have been if they couldn’t eat for a month. I still can’t look at a bottle of Ensure without having flashbacks! But I am so happy that I am on the right track to keep improving and I plan to stay on it, no matter what my fears are.

I think I will always be somewhat afraid to go to a dentist or periodontist but this is a great first step in, at least, lessening my phobia a little bit. In fact, I might even be a little excited to keep going back and I feel hopeful that I will continue to make improvements. GOOD FOR ME! 🙂

What are you afraid of? How do you face your fears? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

4 Things That Are Ruining Your Smile (And What To Do About Them)

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4 Things That Are Ruining Your Smile (And What To Do About Them)

Although we get two sets during our lifetime, it is still important that we take good care of our teeth. Indeed, without the proper care, we can expect to encounter all sorts of problems from bad breath to infection and tooth loss. The good news is that by identifying the things that can harm our teeth, we can make sure we take steps to avoid or counter them. Keep reading to find out what the most common smile ruining things are below:

Too much sugar:

It tastes great but too much sugar is very bad news for your teeth. This is because it encourages tartar to form which can lead to painful and unsightly gum disease, otherwise known as gingivitis. That’s not the half of it, either, because sugar also combines with the bacteria we all have in our mouths to cause plaque, this is the stuff that erodes tooth enamel and leaves your teeth vulnerable to decay!

Fortunately, there are some tactics you can use to combat the effects of too much sugar on your smile. The first is to try and reduce the amount of sugar that you eat, limiting items like candy, cakes, and sodas. Next, if you do eat something sugary, brushing your teeth right after can help remove excess sugar from the mouth and minimize the effect.

Smoking:

Another thing that can wreak havoc with your smile is smoking. Of course, it’s also disastrous for your health, so there are many reasons to quit as soon as possible. In particular, smoking is known to yellow the teeth and can turn an already unsightly plaque to a nasty brown color. Once again quitting is the best course of action here. Although, as a short-term measure, regular teeth cleaning at the dentist, as well as specialized toothpaste designed for smokers can help.

Putting off going to the dentist:

While we are on the subject of dentists, putting off your appointment can severely impact your smile too. Unfortunately, there are many reasons why people may not go to the dentist as often as they should such as anxiety and embarrassment that they haven’t taken care of their oral health in the right way.

Of course, the longer that you leave between appointments the more damage you are likely to do to your smile. You can make regular dental appointments a great deal easier for yourself by finding a good dentist, one that is friendly and non-judgmental. Many dental practices even specialize in helping particularly anxious patients now, which can make the whole experience much easier.

Grinding your teeth:

Last of all, you may be ruining your smile by grinding your teeth. Teeth grinding is when a person unconsciously forces their jaw together in a slight chewing motion and can be linked to stress. The problem with teeth grinding is that it can put far too much pressure on each tooth and make them much more likely to crack and wear away, something that can be both painful and unsightly.

To counter teeth grinding and improve your smile it may be useful to wear a mouth guard at night. Also, finding some ways that are effective for reducing stress may help you minimize this habit and save your smile.

Improve your smile with the tips above and flash those pearly whites!

Give Yourself An Instant Summer Makeover

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Give Yourself An Instant Summer Makeover

After over a year of being cooped up due to the pandemic, it is only understandable to want to put your best self forward now that it is possible to be out and about again. There is no better way to wow those who you haven’t seen in so long with a makeover! The options we’ll discuss will have instant results and you will be sure to stun the next time you step out. Let’s get to it:

Visit The Dentist:

It was so strange to not be able to see what anyone really looked like during the pandemic because of the face masks and it is nice to see people smiling again. Speaking of smiling, how is yours looking? Bi yearly trips to the dentist are a must and a cleaning will make your pearly whites even prettier when you flash a smile. If more extensive work needs done, your dentist could use the high quality appliances from orthodontic laboratory Toronto to completely perfect your smile. Instant makeover? I think yes!

Upgrade Your Wardrobe:

There is no need to buy a brand new wardrobe with the changing of the seasons. Rather, upgrade what you already have by purchasing a few statement and weather appropriate pieces to refresh your wardrobe. It will be such fun to go shopping again and now that fitting rooms are open, don’t be afraid to experiment with things you wouldn’t normally try on. You never know if something works unless you try it and new to you shapes and colors will be an automatic boost to your closet.

Don’t Skimp On Skin Care:

There is something to be said for bright, soft skin so don’t skimp on skin care this summer. You can’t go wrong with a gel moisturizer for lightweight hydration and don’t forget to get one with SPF in it! The same goes for a body lotion with SPF too. We see a lot more of everyone in the summer thanks to shorts and tank tops so no dry patches allowed! Make your complexion the most radiant with a Vitamin C serum and now we’re in business.

Work On You:

People just glow differently when they are happy, don’t they? Spend some time each day with yourself to meditate, journal, do yoga – whatever. As long as you are relaxing and focusing on inner peace your “me time” could be anything. The important thing is that you are working to improve your mind and body so you can smile more often and make your aura even more beautiful.

Give yourself an instant makeover this summer with the tips above and don’t be afraid to shine. We all deserve it after facing so many difficulties this past year!

Quick Tips For An Even Better Smile

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Quick Tips For An Even Better Smile

Your smile is one of the first things that people notice about you. A lot of people worry about how their smile looks, especially in photographs. If you’re worried about yours, try these tips for an even better smile that is healthier too:

Floss daily:

Flossing gets rid of plaque from between your teeth and out from under your gum line, where your toothbrush doesn’t reach. Flossing makes you less likely to suffer from tooth decay and gingivitis. Without flossing, tartar builds up under the surface of your gum lines, which can lead to periodontal disease. This causes bone destruction and tooth loss. To floss properly, wrap the floss around your finger and slide it into the gap between your teeth. Slide the floss gently up and down under the gum line two or three times. If you don’t like the feeling of flossing, you can use an oral irrigater instead. These spray water between your teeth to remove plaque and food without the need for floss.

See your dentist twice a year:

A professional cleaning every six months is a great way to maintain a gorgeous smile by keeping it healthy. If you don’t get a regular cleaning from a dentist, you could have an increased risk of periodontal disease. This causes swollen, receding, and bleeding gums, which is uncomfortable and unattractive. It is also linked to a greater risk of conditions including heart attack, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and sleep apnea. A good cleaning will remove stain and tartar. A regular trip to your dentist also means they can screen for other health conditions. Many health conditions have early signs that show in the mouth, so your dentist or hygienist can catch many problems very early that you can then follow up with your doctor. Your dentist can also advise you on solutions for your smile like whitening, braces, or Freedom Mini Dental Implants.

Limit tea, coffee, and red wine:

Drinks like coffee, tea, and red wine are all known for staining your teeth. They can build up a superficial stain that your dentist will be able to polish away for you, but they could also cause much deeper staining of the tooth enamel that is much harder to remove. Drinking these drinks through a straw can help to reduce the risk of staining, and can also reduce the likelihood of tooth decay. Rinse your mouth with water after drinking anything like this so the dark liquid won’t stay on the teeth, and have a chance to stain.

Buy a quality toothbrush:

Electric toothbrushes remove more plaque and give you healthier gums than manual toothbrushes. If nothing else, buy a manual brush that has soft bristles. Bristles that are too stiff and brushing too hard can cause your gums to recede and will wear down the enamel from your teeth. Use a soft-bristled brush, and brush gently to avoid damaging your teeth by accident.

Ready, set, smile!

Featured Image By: Unsplash

Know About Cigarettes & Your Teeth

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Know About Cigarettes & Your Teeth

It is well known that smoking not only negatively affects your physical health but your oral health too. According to the American Lung Association, approximately more than 7000 chemicals mixed with nicotine are found in tobacco. It’s difficult to stop due to the addictive qualities nicotine has on people, along with the withdrawal symptoms caused. However, the adverse effects are far worse long-term for your oral health, as gum disease, tooth loss, oral cancer, and halitosis are some of the many risks to look out for. Keep reading for a better understanding on these:

Gum Disease:

Gum disease or gingivitis, which could possibly lead to periodontitis, can be caused by smoking. The build-up of plaque on the teeth, which could then harden to tartar, is increased bacteria buildup, creating red, inflamed, and bleeding gums that could develop into an infection. Smoking hinders the healing process, and if left unchecked, the issues could lead to tooth loss. There are multiple symptoms and risk factors, but it’s essential to check it out with your dentist if you see red flag signs. It is crucial to prevent the effects from getting worse over time.

Oral Effects of Smoking:

The adverse effects of smoking lead to tooth decay, teeth discoloration, and bad breath (halitosis) caused by the build-up of tar and nicotine. With this, your sense of taste begins to decrease along with your appetite. Nicotine, when combined with oxygen, is known to cause discoloration. The tar build-up leaves behind yellow or black discoloration on the teeth and an intense build-up on the tongue called the smoker’s tongue. These are a combination of adverse effects caused by the ingredients being absorbed in the mouth.

Prevention & Treatment For Gum Disease and Oral Health:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day
  • Mouth Wash
  • Floss every day
  • See a dentist regularly
  • Deep cleaning
  • Medications (if treatment is needed)
  • Quit smoking

Risk of Oral Cancer:

According to the WHO, smoking leads to multiple forms of cancer and accounts for 90% of them, including oral cancer. It is known to weaken the immune system and make healing harder. If you have regular checkups with your dentist, such as Summer Creek Dental, you can detect the symptoms in their early stages. An oral cancer screening is highly recommended for smokers as 27% of deaths recorded in Europe in 2018 have been positively linked to smoking. Mouth cancer is likely to be developed in the tongue, lips, and throat.

If you can quit smoking, it has been found that the build of bacteria decreases, and your sense of taste and smell start to return. Your mouth can be restored once you quit with your practitioner’s help, which will most likely bring back a bright smile and a better mood. If leaving isn’t entirely on the cards yet, it’s essential to take extra care of your oral health and regularly assist in prevention.

Featured Image By: Pexels

How To Help Your Child Get Over A Fear Of The Dentist

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How To Help Your Child Get Over A Fear Of The Dentist

You know that going to the dentist is very important for your oral health, but children often feel scared of the dentist, and it can be hard to get them to go. It’s common to feel nervous before the dentist, however, a serious fear of the dentist could stop your children from looking after their teeth properly in later life. How can you help them to overcome their fear? Read on to find out more:

Find The Right Dentist:

There are dentists who specialize in treating fearful patients, so look for them, or see a family dentist like ÉLAN Dentistry who is used to nervous children. These dentists take extra care to make their office seem less scary. This might mean using soothing photography or music, instead of displaying dental care posters. Sometimes the dentist themselves will dress in more casual clothing instead of scrubs. The sights, sounds, and smells of a typical dentist’s office can be frightening, so removing those triggers can help a lot. Look for a dentist who understands and will work around your child’s fear.

Talk To Them:

Make sure your child understands what will happen while they’re at the dentist. Talk to them about their appointment and explain what will happen (in as non-scary a way as you can manage), so they know what to expect. If they know what will happen, this can make the appointment less scary for them. Ask the dentist to explain what they’re doing throughout the appointment too, so your child isn’t surprised by something they didn’t know would happen.

Distract Them:

Look for distractions while your child is in the dentist’s chair. Take some headphones for them and let them listen to music or an audiobook. Find a dentist who has a TV for patients to watch in the chair and put on one of their favorite shows.

Try relaxation techniques:

Controlled breathing can work well. Get your child to take a deep breath, hold it in, then let it out very slowly. This slows the heartbeat and relaxes the muscles. You could also get them to try progressive muscle relaxation, which is when you tense and relax different muscle groups in succession to ease tension.

See the dentist at a less busy time:

There will be fewer people there, so less chance of hearing the noise of dental tools from other rooms. Your dentist is also more likely to have more time to ease your child’s fears and let them take small breaks than they will at busier times when they might be running behind on their appointments. The later you go in the day, the more time your child has to let their fears build up too.

Get Help:

If your child’s fear is becoming a phobia, then it might be worth having them speak with a therapist. Treating a dentist phobia is much like other any other, and is often helped by direct therapeutic exposure. This means your child will be introduced to feared items, such as dental tools, in a controlled, gradual, non-threatening manner.

As mentioned above, being nervous to go to the dentist is completely normal. If your child is fearful of the dentist, try any of the above tips before their next cleaning!

Featured Image By: Unsplash

How To Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy

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How To Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy

Children are vulnerable to most dental infections. Even though dentistry services have advanced recently due to technology, parents still have to play active roles to improve their dental health and that of their little ones. Oral health is essential because untreated dental conditions have been associated with diabetes, stroke, and heart diseases in adults. Also referred to as dental caries, tooth decay affects kids and adults. Thankfully, these are largely preventable with good practices. Here are a few tips to promote your child’s dental health:

Start caring for dental health as soon as possible:

By the age of 6 months, you may want to stop your baby from taking breast milk or formula at night. It has been thought that late night breastfeeding increases the risk of tooth decay in kids due to the lactose content (milk sugar). By 1-year-old, your child needs to have access to dental care services and be examined by dentists every three to six months. Dental services for families may differ and may include consulting pediatric dentists. Parents who live in the Lehi, Utah area may find Dry Creek Pediatric Dentistry services very helpful for their infants and children.

Stick to a healthy diet:

Being mindful of your child’s diet is one way to ensure that they don’t eat foods that increase their risks of getting cavities. The rule of thumb is that any food or drink with high sugar content is potentially unhealthy for their dental health. When your child eats more carbs, they will have a higher tendency to develop cavities.

Let your children taste the natural sweetness of fruits instead – that is way healthier than giving them too much candy. Discourage your little ones from eating a lot of snacks and soda pop. These not only could expose them to obesity; the mixture of sugar and acid could break down their teeth. The same is valid for juice – it’s another form of soda pop with no carbonation.

Give kids fluoride:

Routine application of fluoride hardens the enamel, making it difficult for acid to penetrate the teeth. While some town water supply systems are fluoridated, others are not. If that is the case in your community, you can ask your dentist to recommend fluoride supplements for you and your family. The majority of toothpaste on the market contains fluoride, but that alone is not enough to protect your child’s teeth.

Having said that too, excessive amounts of fluoride can lead to tooth discoloration. Always consult your dentists before giving supplements to your kids. During your children’s annual dental exam, dentists may apply fluoride varnish to their teeth. This topical fluoride helps prevent and heal early cavities.

When your child starts to develop permanent teeth, your dentist may apply a thin wash of resin (sealant) to the back of their teeth where chewing occurs. This coating prevents tooth decay by stopping bacteria from settling in the crevices of the molars. Finally, understand that regular flossing and brushing are essential to good dental hygiene.

A good understanding of dental care that is taught early on in your child’s life is so important and will help them to be proactive in better protecting their teeth.

Featured Image By: Pixabay

Nothing To Smile About! The Risks Of Poor Oral Hygiene

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Nothing To Smile About! The Risks Of Poor Oral Hygiene

When we are looking to optimize our health with the right practices, we may not necessarily give as much attention to our oral health as we should. While we all know the importance of flossing and brushing our teeth, the reality is that if we do not look after our teeth properly, it could set us up for more problems down the line. If we have poor oral health, we will experience toothache, bleeding gums, and bad breath, but if we neglect our oral health, we could end up with one or more of the following conditions:

Cardiovascular Disease:

If the gums are inflamed, the risk of bacteria getting into the bloodstream increases. There are many reasons that your teeth could allow bacteria into the bloodstream, even if you brush them properly. Misaligned teeth may hide a number of germs that you are not able to access. Furthermore, wisdom teeth that hide underneath the gum could also harbor bacteria. In order to prevent any form of the disease, cardiovascular or gum, proper oral hygiene is crucial. A winning combination of regular trips to the dentist, while also aligning your teeth with products like Invisalign or braces make sure that any hidden debris that is hard to access is greatly minimized.

Respiratory Infections:

Surprisingly, poor oral health can result in issues in the respiratory system. This is because any bacteria that stays in the mouth from infected teeth or swollen gums could be breathed into the lungs or travel to the lungs through the bloodstream. Bacteria in the lungs could cause breathing issues such as respiratory infections, COPD, and bronchitis.

Kidney Disease:

Chronic kidney disease can cause havoc with blood pressure and affect the bones and heart. People with gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, can have weaker immune systems, which give them a higher likelihood of getting infections. People can potentially experience kidney disease if they suffer from poor oral health.

Diabetes:

While diabetics are more susceptible to infections, such as infected gums, it can work the other way. Periodontal disease can make diabetes more difficult to keep under control. People with diabetes have fluctuating blood sugar levels, which can be a direct cause of gum disease. Gum disease can cause higher than normal blood sugar levels, therefore, a person with poor oral health is at a higher risk of getting diabetes. However, this can be mitigated by having a healthy diet.

There’s a lot of risks associated with poor oral hygiene, including rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer. The best way to prevent any serious issues resulting from bad oral health is to practice good oral hygiene. It is all about simple things, including brushing the teeth for at least two minutes twice a day, avoiding tobacco products, as well as flossing. Healthy gums are, in many ways, a window to your general health. While it’s important to maintain good health practices, we also need to be aware of the risks of poor oral hygiene too.

Featured Image By: Pixabay