Tag Archives: oral hygiene

Pikin’ & Grinnin’

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Pikin’ & Grinnin’

Hello! First of all, major props to whomever got the Hee Haw reference of this post title! Second of all, I have been absolutely loving the waterpik that I purchased after my visit to the periodontist last week. During my appointment, I was so pleased to learn that my dental problems had remained stable during my long stint of no check ups thanks to the pandemic. To continue improving the issues, I bought a waterpik as soon as I got home as per the recommendations of the professionals:

I am still getting used to using my new waterpik and literally every review I have read on them was right – it is very messy at first! I have had to resort to laying a bath towel around the sink because the water just gets everywhere. I know that these mini flash floods in my bathroom will come to a halt once I get better at using the waterpik, though, so that is not a deterrent in the slightest.

I also read on the reviews for the waterpik that I bought that it was incredibly noisy but I haven’t found that to be true at all. It has the noise you would expect from a product like this – nothing more, nothing less. Even if it were obnoxiously loud, you can’t beat the price of this waterpik (about seventy dollars) for how well it works and all of the different accessories that comes with it.

This waterpik included five different tips which will help in different ways:

  • Plaque seeker tip: This one needs no further explanation
  • Toothbrush tip: Neither does this one
  • Tongue cleaner tip: Or this one
  • Orthodontic tip: This one is good for people with braces
  • Pik pocket tip: This is the one that I use as it gets deep into the periodontal pockets for an intense clean

I have been using my waterpik with the pik pocket tip every morning and night and my gums have already started to feel better. They are not as tender and I feel them getting healthier with every use. Dare I say it, I am almost looking forward to my next appointments with my dentist and periodontist because this is going to improve my oral hygiene tenfold and I think that they are going to be proud! 😀

Do you use a waterpik? How do you feel about going to the dentist? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

Nothing To Smile About! The Risks Of Poor Oral Hygiene

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Nothing To Smile About! The Risks Of Poor Oral Hygiene

When we are looking to optimize our health with the right practices, we may not necessarily give as much attention to our oral health as we should. While we all know the importance of flossing and brushing our teeth, the reality is that if we do not look after our teeth properly, it could set us up for more problems down the line. If we have poor oral health, we will experience toothache, bleeding gums, and bad breath, but if we neglect our oral health, we could end up with one or more of the following conditions:

Cardiovascular Disease:

If the gums are inflamed, the risk of bacteria getting into the bloodstream increases. There are many reasons that your teeth could allow bacteria into the bloodstream, even if you brush them properly. Misaligned teeth may hide a number of germs that you are not able to access. Furthermore, wisdom teeth that hide underneath the gum could also harbor bacteria. In order to prevent any form of the disease, cardiovascular or gum, proper oral hygiene is crucial. A winning combination of regular trips to the dentist, while also aligning your teeth with products like Invisalign or braces make sure that any hidden debris that is hard to access is greatly minimized.

Respiratory Infections:

Surprisingly, poor oral health can result in issues in the respiratory system. This is because any bacteria that stays in the mouth from infected teeth or swollen gums could be breathed into the lungs or travel to the lungs through the bloodstream. Bacteria in the lungs could cause breathing issues such as respiratory infections, COPD, and bronchitis.

Kidney Disease:

Chronic kidney disease can cause havoc with blood pressure and affect the bones and heart. People with gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, can have weaker immune systems, which give them a higher likelihood of getting infections. People can potentially experience kidney disease if they suffer from poor oral health.

Diabetes:

While diabetics are more susceptible to infections, such as infected gums, it can work the other way. Periodontal disease can make diabetes more difficult to keep under control. People with diabetes have fluctuating blood sugar levels, which can be a direct cause of gum disease. Gum disease can cause higher than normal blood sugar levels, therefore, a person with poor oral health is at a higher risk of getting diabetes. However, this can be mitigated by having a healthy diet.

There’s a lot of risks associated with poor oral hygiene, including rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer. The best way to prevent any serious issues resulting from bad oral health is to practice good oral hygiene. It is all about simple things, including brushing the teeth for at least two minutes twice a day, avoiding tobacco products, as well as flossing. Healthy gums are, in many ways, a window to your general health. While it’s important to maintain good health practices, we also need to be aware of the risks of poor oral hygiene too.

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