Tag Archives: options

Signs That It’s Time To Leave Your Job

Standard
Signs That It’s Time To Leave Your Job

It’s easy for us to get used to our jobs and maybe even feel content with them, to the detriment of our future advancement. Just because a job is easy and it’s pleasant doesn’t mean that is is the right place for you to be. While there’s nothing wrong with staying at a job because it’s easy and we know what we’re doing, it can lead to complacency, and you might still be there ten years down the line when all of your colleagues have moved on to bigger and better things.

To avoid being trapped by complacency, here are some sure signs that it’s time to move on from your current job:

Your Life Is The Status Quo: If you’ve been doing the same job with the same routine every day for so long that you can’t even remember when it started, it might be time to look elsewhere to start really building a career. If promotions in your current place are hard to come by and you haven’t been considered despite being more than qualified, chances are you could definitely do better. And who doesn’t want to spice up their life a little>

You’re Never Given Feedback: Feedback, both positive and negative, is important for your development. If you don’t know what you’re doing right and which things could be improved upon, you’ll never be able to grow into the best professional that you can be.

Your Bosses Are Being Difficult: If after all of the hard work and dedication you’ve put into building their business, your bosses are so difficult that you have to see a workers compensation lawyer or they put you on probation because you had to take a few days out to look after a sick family member, take it as a clear nudge to get out. It’s rarely worth sticking with a company that doesn’t value you, especially when you’re only doing it because the work is easy or it’s a little more convenient for you.

There’s A Mass Exodus: If your long-term coworkers all start to abandon ship around the same time, it’s probably worth finding out why. If they’re experiencing problems in the workplace, it’s only a matter of time before you start experiencing the same issues, too. Or, if they’re leaving because they’ve found better opportunities elsewhere, you could, too!

You’ve Been Contacted By Headhunters: If you’ve been contacted by headhunters who’ve gone out of their way to try and poach you, you’d be foolish not to at least consider it. If a company really wants you, it’s usually because they’re impressed by your work and are willing to pay for the experience that you bring to the table. You may be able to negotiate a better salary and more workplace benefits with them than you could in your current position. And, once again, who doesn’t want that?

You’ve Already Been Considering It: If you’ve been thinking about leaving, even if they’ve only been idle thoughts, it could be a sign that you’ve grown weary of your job, even if you don’t fully realize it yourself. Don’t dismiss these thoughts and look into your options, because everyone has them.

Leaving a steady job can be scary, but sometimes it’s the only way to move forward to bigger and better things in your life.

Featured Image By: Pixabay

Mostly Bloodless Medical Jobs For The Squeamish

Standard
Mostly Bloodless Medical Jobs For The Squeamish

A lot of people fancy a career in the medical sector. But when they sit down and really think about what it involves – cutting people open and having their guts spew out – suddenly it doesn’t seem so appealing. But the good news, is that not everybody in healthcare is ripping open chest cavities and reattaching severed limbs. In fact, there are plenty of positions which don’t involve any blood at all.

Don’t let your squeamishness put you off from getting a job in this sector. Here are some of the jobs that are open to you at all levels and qualifications, minimal blood included:

Respiratory Therapist: One of the best ways to become valuable as a healthcare worker is to drill down and focus on a single area of expertise. Respiratory therapists do just that, focusing on helping people who have trouble breathing and doing tests to get to the bottom of their condition. The good thing about becoming a respiratory therapist is that there is comparatively little blood involved. You will have to insert tubes into patients’ windpipes, but if you can get over that hurdle, you’re almost home and dry.

Like other jobs in healthcare, experts believe that the demand for respiratory therapists will remain strong over the next five years, at least. Respiratory therapists are likely to be in high demand thanks to the increasing prevalence of lung-related disorders, such as asthma and COPD. Salaries are competitive. For just a couple of year’s training to get an associate degree, a trained respiratory therapist can take home $60,000 per year.

Nutritionist: Chronic diseases and obesity are currently the major cause of disability in Western countries like the US. Yes, people need heroic medicine if they break their leg, and they need antibiotics when they get an infection, but the vast majority of illness is the result of diet and lifestyle. Your job as a nutritionist is to help people modify their diets, change their habits and chip away at the underlying causes of their illnesses.

A cool thing about being a nutritionist is that by working closely enough with patients, you can help them not only manage their chronic diseases but reverse them, too. The medical literature is full of studies in which people with conditions like heart disease, angina, and diabetes get better, all by shifting their diets to healthier options.

The obesity crisis isn’t going anywhere, and so dietitians are likely to remain on the front lines for a long time to come, helping to motivate people to choose healthier behaviors and options. Pay averages around $57,000 per year, though it’s possible to make more by getting high profile private clients, selling books, and blogging.

Radiologist: Radiologists are doctors with relatively few actual contact hours with patients. They spend most of their time reading up on the latest diagnostic technology and finding out how to best deliver it to their patients. Radiology is currently an exciting field: scanning technologies are progressing at an exponential rate and before long, radiologists will be able to view every cell in the body at sub-micron resolutions, allowing them to pinpoint the exact source of a person’s illness.

As a radiologist, you’re also liable to work with technology in the future, specifically artificial intelligence, perhaps the single most important advance in the medical sector for decades. With the help of AI, radiologists seek and identify diseases in their patients and offer treatment options. According to http://www.wikiprofessional.org/index.php?title=Radiologist_Salary the average salary for a radiologist is $130,000 per year. However, the top 10 percent earn more than $187,000.

Radiation Therapist: The job of a radiation therapist is to administer cancer treatment to patients. Their purpose is to not only operate the equipment itself but explain to patients their treatment options. According to https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/medical-imaging-and-radiotherapy/, you need an accredited degree or postgraduate program to become a radiation therapist. You’ll need all of the training that you can get to adequately monitor the progress of the patient during treatment.

Radiotherapy is expected to increase as the population ages. Currently, around 39 percent of Americans get cancer at some point in their lives. This is projected to rise to 50 percent over the next twenty years. Thus, unless technology changes, the number of radiation therapy jobs is expected to boom by more than 25 percent until 2022. That’s pushing wages up, too. A radiation therapist can earn more than $83,000 per year. What’s more, there’s no blood involved.

meddd1

Health.mil Image

Does the sight of blood make you cringe? Do you still want a job in the medical field? Then, some of the above job options might be for you!

Featured Image By: Wikimedia Commons