Tag Archives: puppy

4 Home Décor Doggy Dos And Don’ts To Live By

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4 Home Décor Doggy Dos And Don’ts To Live By

Everybody wants the American dream – the job, the partner, and the house. Decorating is something homeowners take seriously because it impacts lives. Living in a dark, dingy property is bound to make you miserable. Likewise, renovating every other week and spending a small fortune on repair won’t help your stress levels. You want a dream home, and that means the interior has to be perfect.

Unfortunately, as a pet owner, this isn’t always easy. As well as being cuddly and adorable, dogs are messy and can cause havoc. One minute they’re chilling and the next they’re chewing anything in sight. Even when pooches are happy and relaxed, the hair from their fur cramps your home’s style. Yep, it isn’t straightforward to be an animal lover and a fashionista at the same time. But, with home décor dos and don’ts for dogs, you can finally live in peace without fear of coming home to a scratched-up sofa. Here’s what to do and what not to do:

Don’t: Splurge Too Much

It’s nice to splurge on furniture or rugs; it helps to turn the house into a home. The problem, is that dogs aren’t clean freaks and they will tread things through the house, especially in the winter. What you’re left with is a permanently stained armchair or shag rug, which will be marked forever. No matter what you do, nothing will lift the stain so it’s money down the drain.

Cheap alternatives might not look as good but they are easier to replace. Plus, the fabrics aren’t as thick or deep so the marks tend to come out with the help of baking soda and warm, soapy water. If you do buy something expensive that you want to preserve, make sure it comes with a guarantee.

Of course, you can spend money on features that are expensive yet don’t have the same risk. Tiles are perfect examples. High-quality tiles are costly and instantly boost the appeal of a home, and they don’t leave permanent stains. Thanks to the texture, dirt and grime are straightforward to wipe off with a little bit of elbow grease.

Do: Put Breakables Out Of Reach

Most homes have things that are fancy and expensive. They are also fragile and break at the slightest touch. With a canine jumping up and down, they are perilous objects to decorate with unless they are in a safe place. That means, putting them out of reach where nobody, not even a playful Labrador, can get to them.

First, place breakable items on shelves. As long as the shelves are a couple of feet from the ground, they should be secure yet still in your eye line. Another option, is to hang them from the walls. Hanging art is the new thing for pet owners as they create a dramatic feel and are out of your pet’s reach. https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20160718/midtown/hang-heavy-pictures-mirrors-objects-how has more.

Last but not least, don’t forget about cabinets. Because they’re sturdy, they’re hard to push over or knock down. But, thanks to the glass, you can still put your delicate features on display so that the interior doesn’t take a hit. Put one in the corner of the room up against a wall to make it doubly safe from energetic canines.

Don’t: Leave Furniture Uncovered

Furniture is often the focal point of any room. Walk into the kitchen, living room, or bathroom and the first thing you’ll notice are the fixtures. So, it’s imperative that they are in as good a condition as physically possible for a long time. Furniture doesn’t come cheap and homeowners don’t want to replace them regularly. The good news, is that covers are available which prevent dogs from making a mess.

Slipcovers aren’t the most attractive accessories in the world, but they do make a difference. From scratches to marks to bodily functions, the plastic sheet bears the brunt of the damage. Owners whose pooches suffer from a lack of bladder training might want to check out https://petparentsbrand.com/products/dog-belly-bands. There are some things slipcovers can’t prevent that doggie diapers can.

To spruce things up, you can swap slipcovers for throws and blankets. As long as they don’t potty everywhere, a throw is a perfect protector. Plus, it’s machine-washable so you don’t have to throw it out when it gets dirty. Put it in the washing machine and it will come out as good as new. Https://www.thespruce.com/great-pet-friendly-fabrics-1976777 is an excellent source of inspiration if you need it.

Do: Be The Boss

Although there are ways to limit the damage, the best course of action is to take control. As the owner, the dog should listen to your commands. This doesn’t mean you need to be a dictator; more you should set rules they have to follow. There is still some flexibility as long as they are in the right place. Take a doggy corner as an example. Choose a part of the room where it doesn’t matter if they molt and get fur on the floor or mark with their muddy paws. A pet-zone gives you and your dog the ability to relax without always thinking about the furniture. Pick somewhere with a hardwood or laminate floor to avoid stains.

With a pet, there are precautions you have to take to maintain the décor in your home. Use the tips above to get your place chic AND pet friendly.

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Keeping Your Home Clean When You Have A Dog

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Keeping Your Home Clean When You Have A Dog

There’s much to love about having a dog in the home. They infuse it with energy, bring bundles of love, and who can deny that they’re fun creatures to be around? However, while the number of benefits outweighs the drawbacks, there is one pretty big problem that you’ll have to contend with, and that is that having a dog can result in a home that’s less clean than you might like. With that being said, it’s not as if you need to simply resign yourself to a home that’s dirty. You can take action! Below, we take a look at a few ways you can get the best of both worlds: have a pet and have a presentable home.

Use the Right Materials:

If your dog is going to leave a trail of hair and dirt behind them, then it’s a good idea to have materials that won’t be quickly destroyed by those things. When it comes to the fabrics in your home, look at things like leather, microfiber, and materials that were originally designed for outdoor use – they’ll be robust enough to handle whatever your dog throws at it. A cover for your couch that can easily be slipped off and thrown into the wash is also recommended.

Get a Good Vacuum:

Not all vacuums are created equal! Dog owners end up vacuuming more often than their non-dog owner counterparts. So, if you’re going to make this a daily occurrence, you may as well make sure that you’re doing it as efficiently as possible. It’ll be worthwhile spending that extra amount of cash to ensure it’s going to pick up the hair and dirt at the first time of asking.

Make Them Presentable:

The cleaner your dog is, the less of a negative impact they’ll have on your home. It’s as simple as that. As such, you’ll be well served by taking them to a local dog grooming company; they’ll make sure that your dog is scrubbed clean and manage their fur, which will mean there will be less hair to fall in your home. Dogs have a habit of getting dirtier than you think possible, and even if they look okay on the surface, you never know what’s going on when you delve deep into their fur. By making the most of grooming services, you’ll be getting around this issue.

After Long Walks:

Of course, you won’t be able to take your dog to be groomed after every big walk. Alas, after every walk, they’re going to be muddy. It’s a good idea to set up a cleaning station near the entrance way to your home, where you can clean their paws so they’re not going to bring mountains of mud into the home.

Stay on Top of Incidents:

Finally, let’s not forget that even the most well-behaved dogs can have incidents. They may pee on the carpet or knock a drink over. When this happens, it’s important that you’re cleaning it up thoroughly. If you don’t, those little marks will soon add up, and compromise the quality of your home.

Dogs are an amazing addition to any family, fur and all! And, to keep a clean home, it is all about staying on top of the mess in the first place, before things get too out of hand.

Featured Image By: Pexels

Your Checklist To Prepare Your Home For A New Dog

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Your Checklist To Prepare Your Home For A New Dog

Getting a dog and bringing it to your home can be a huge milestone for the entire family. From a new puppy to adopting a dog, there is so much fun and excitement that comes with a new pet for the family. The environment that you bring them home to is so important, though, and the first day that you bring them back is crucial, too. Your dog is going to be full of nerves and excitement, as they are brought into something so different than what they have been used to. So being able to make them as comfortable as possible is key. With all of that in mind, here are some things that you can do to make sure that the transition to getting a new dog goes well:

Prepare All Household Members:

If you have other family members in the home, even if it is just you and your partner, you all need to be prepared for the new arrival. If you have children at home, then it is a good idea to talk to them about what is going to be happening. It is also wise to assign out the expectations of welcoming a new dog into the home, as well. If you expect the children or teenagers to help with walking the dog, then they need to know ahead of time that it is what you expect of them.

Get The Right Equipment:

Before you bring the dog into your home, you need to make sure that you have all of the right equipment in to make things more comfortable for your dog. A dog bed, bedding, bowls, toys, and food is a must, of course. The food can be trial and error with a new dog but starting with something like TreeHousePuppies could be a good idea. Vitamins can be a good for your dog, too.

Puppy-Proof:

All dogs are going to react differently to different things and the new environment that they are going to presented with. But it can be made much simpler by making sure that you have done your bit to puppy-proof the home. It could be simple things like putting houseplants out of reach for your dog or moving things like roach traps out of the way, too. If you don’t want them to go upstairs, then getting gates for the stairs, much like baby gates, is going to be a great idea and using them right from the start is a must to avoid confusion.

Getting a vet for your dog is one of the things you should do once they’re all settled. This can be especially important if you are adopting a dog as you won’t know what the state of their health could be. But most of all, enjoy your time with your new addition to the family!

Featured Image By: Pixabay

And They Call It Puppy Love…

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And They Call It Puppy Love…

It doesn’t matter whether you have welcomed a not so little new St Bernard, a cute little puppy pug, or a delightful dachshund into your home, there are certain things that you must do to ensure that your new pup is receiving the best care. As a responsible owner, you want your new dog to feel like a part of the family straight away. At the same time, you don’t want anything to overwhelm him. In the same way as you would welcome home a new little human bundle of joy, you need to take time to settle into a new routine for your puppy. Take a look at what you can do to ensure a smooth transition for both you and your canine:

Nutrition:

There is no point in bringing your new pup home only to feed him food that he’s never tasted before. The chances are that he adores the grub that the breeder was feeding him, so ensure that you get a crate of it. Familiar smells and tastes will help settle the nerves of your pooch. Ensure that you bring the toys that he has played with in his previous environment and place them in his new playpen. This will be the first time that your new dog has been away from his litter pals and mom, so it’s vital that you are on hand pretty much twenty four seven, at least for the first few weeks.

Behavior:

It’s not uncommon for your puppy to bite especially as he’s getting to know his own capabilities. It’s vital that you try and nip this in the bud as soon as possible. Alongside formal puppy training to teach him the traditional obedience commands, you need to back this up with a firm but fair approach at home. When playing with your new four legged friend, don’t use your hand directly and instead use a toy. If they do manage to bite (often during play) then show a sad face, say firmly ‘no biting’ and ignore them for up to a minute. With consistent responses to his nipping, you should find that the behavior stops very quickly. Any issues, and you can get expert advice as to how to halt the biting.

Some puppies scratch or destroy items around the home. While this may be playful and amusing if he gets hold of a sock and demolishes it, this can be more serious if you return home from grocery shopping to see your sofa destroyed. This is classic separation anxiety and needs to be addressed. Go out for very short periods of time and build up the minutes you are away very slowly. Ensure that you play with him a lot and leave plenty to interest him when you are out to prevent destructive tendencies.

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So. Cute!

Exercise:

When ready, it’s important to get your pooch used to other canines. The easiest way to do this is to take relaxing strolls down to the park. Take your time and don’t be worried if your dog seems a little nervous. This is natural. Keep him on the leash and allow him to sniff other dogs, but keep a close eye on him to ensure there’s no aggressive behavior.

Before you know it, you will have a brand new and established member of your family – an adorable one, at that!

Featured Image By: Pixabay

Lil Red’s House/Pet Sitting Tips & Tricks

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Lil Red’s House/Pet Sitting Tips & Tricks

Hello! A great way to make some extra scratch and earn some brownie points with your neighbors is to house and pet sit for them. I just finished up a week long gig watching over my next door neighbor’s two pups and home while she celebrated the holidays in sunny California with her husband, son, and daughter in law. Although this might sound like an easy task, there is a lot more to it than you would think and this post will offer some of my go to tips and tricks to make you the best sitter ever.

If you are house sitting:

Always Get Their Mail/Newspapers:

During my criminology class in college, one of the prime things that burglars look for as told by actual burglars was a pileup of newspapers or an overflowing mailbox. If this doesn’t scream “no one is home” than I don’t know what does! If the family you’re sitting for isn’t cancelling their mail and papers for the week, be sure that you are prompt in picking them up upon delivery. Place the newspapers and mail in separate piles and voila – you just knocked one task off of your list for the day!

Make Yourself Known:

It is always a good idea to let your neighbors know that you will be house or pet sitting for a family, if they haven’t done so already. Nosey neighbors love to snoop and one of them had the nerve to text a client of mine that she thought that someone was breaking into their home when it was just me! This will also let your neighbors know to keep an extra eye out for anything suspect when you aren’t home. Try to be at the site that you are sitting for as often and long as you can, because an occupied home is a major deterrent to burglars.

Clean Up:

This should go without saying, but do make sure that you clean up after yourselves! Wash the linens and remake the bed that you slept in upon the homeowners arrival back. Run the dishwasher if there is a pileup of dirty dishes. Water their plants. Get the house looking how it did before the owners left in the first place. I like to Swiffer the floors when I’m housesitting, too. With the snow and rain that Akron has been getting lately, tracking mud is easy to do, and no one wants to come home to that!

If you are pet sitting:

Stick To Their Schedule:

Whether your watching dogs, cats, rabbits, or fish – house pets love their schedule. Learn when the pet owners feed their pets, walk or exercise them, and take them out to potty and stick to it. The pets are probably in a state of confusion or worry that their owners aren’t there and adhering to their schedule can be a huge comfort to them.

Stay And Play:

All of the pets and snuggles can also be a comfort to the animals that you are watching so stick around and just be with them. Play with their toys with them, talk to them, or do some of your own busy work in the house. Your presence can help the pets feel at peace, so if you don’t have to leave just yet, don’t. And, if you have to sneak away to work for a while, turn on the TV or some music until you get back.

Clean Up:

This should also go without saying, but do make sure that you are cleaning up after the pets. Put their toys back in the bin, wipe them off if it was rainy or muddy when they were out (No one likes eau du wet dog and dirty paws!), and clean up any accidents they might have had in the house. It’s not fun, but could you imagine how you would feel if you got home from a trip and there was number one and two everywhere?! If the pets are prone to having accidents in the house, set down some newspaper or piddle pads to make your job a little easier.

If you do your job well while the home or pet owners are away, you will surely be invited back the next time they need someone. And, if they spread the word, you might have your own mini business in no time!

What are some of your tips and tricks when you’re pet or house sitting? Where was the last trip that you went on? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

Four Paws First: Winter Dog Care Tips

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Four Paws First: Winter Dog Care Tips

The winter months can be a magical time of frosty early mornings or cozy sunset walks with your canine companion. But, just as the colder temperatures and extreme weather conditions can take their toll on us, they can also take a toll on our pets. Learn how to combat the conditions and keep your four pawed friend happy and safe this winter:

Adjust Their Diet:

When the temperature drops, you may need to adjust the amount and type of food that you offer. It could be that dogs who are outdoors and being active will require richer food, while animals that become reluctant to exercise outdoors may need less food in order for you to manage their weight. Look up care tips for the particular breed and age of dog, like German Shepherd puppy care, to adjust the food mix to your particular dog and nourish them right.

Keep Them Active:

For some dogs, nothing puts them off from exploring, while others can be very resistant to going outdoors when it gets colder – much like some humans! If your canine companion is less keen on venturing out, make sure that you can keep then active indoors. Provide lots of dog toys to keep them busy and consider setting up an obstacle course if you have the space to keep their bodies and minds active.

Prepare Them For Walks:

When you do go out, bear in mind that bad weather conditions such as fog and the darker early mornings and evenings can reduce visibility. First, make sure that you have good verbal command of your dog and that you can recall them easily. Check to ensure that their microchip details are up to date in case they do get lost. Look for reflective collars or attached LED lights to collars and coats to make them more visible to drivers. And, make sure that you have a winter dog coat if needed, especially if you own a short haired breed such as a greyhound – they will really need the extra warmth.

Keep Up With The Grooming:

Don’t let winter be an excuse to get lax with your animal grooming! Make sure that you are still regularly brushing out the coats of longer haired breeds and using a mild dog shampoo to get out any mud and dirt that becomes matted into their coat during walks. Inspect your dogs paws regularly too, especially if the weather turns icy. A lot of the gritting agents used to stop the ground icing can be damaging on delicate paws, and you may need to use a protective paw balm in icy weather to prevent sores and cracks from forming. If your dog has a longer coat, check that the hairs between their paw pads aren’t trapping little balls of ice and damaging them.

Beware Of Food Hazards:

With your pet in the house more and lots of festive food around, there can be dangers, as most dogs are opportunists when it comes to sneaking a snack! Chocolate can be a particular hazard, as it’s as enticing to canines as it is to humans and yet it contains a compound called theobromine which is toxic to them and can cause their kidneys to fail – this substance is present in the highest concentration in dark chocolate. Foods like avocado can cause an upset tummy, corn on the cob can block their intestines, cooked bones (say from a roast bird) could splinter and perforate their insides, or anything sugar-free containing Xylitol can cause hypoglycemia in dogs. All of these must be stored safely away from curious noses.

Providing your dog with the best care year round, especially during the winter months, will keep them happy, healthy, and around for many more Christmases to come!

Featured Image By: Pexels

Happy Halloween!

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Happy Halloween!

Greetings everyone and a very Happy Halloween to all of you! I hope that all of you who celebrate enjoy a day of tricks and treats and, to those of you who don’t partake in the festivities, have a great normal day! Here is a friendly reminder of my angry dog in her minion costume last year wishing everyone a wonderful day:

halloweenn

Gem says…

Happy Halloween!!