Tag Archives: responsibility

Preparing Your Child For Getting A Pet

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Preparing Your Child For Getting A Pet

Getting a pet is a rite of passage for many children. If you grew up with pets, you might feel like it’s an essential part of childhood. And if you didn’t, perhaps you want to give your children an experience you didn’t get. But it’s important to consider what pet ownership entails before you get one. Making sure your child is ready for the responsibility of a pet is crucial, especially if you don’t want to end up being the only one to care for it. You can prepare your child for getting a pet using a few different techniques:

Start with Toys:

Before taking on the responsibility of caring for a living thing, it’s a good idea for your child to get some practice. One of the ways children often develop key skills such as empathy is through play. Getting your child some toys to care for is a good way to practice some of the things they’ll need to care for a pet. You can get them some Schleich animal figurines or some stuffed toys to role play caring for. Baby dolls can also be an option for taking care of something without the responsibility of actually having to keep something alive.

Give Them Some Other Responsibilities:

Caring for a pet is a big responsibility, so you need to know that your child is ready to take it on. They will need to show that they can manage some responsibilities of their own and keep it up long term too. When you get a pet, your child might help with things like feeding, cleaning, or exercising your pet. But before you go out and get one, they could have a few other chores to show that they’re capable. You can get them to do daily tasks such as making their bed to demonstrate that they can build consistent habits.

Borrow a Pet:

Borrowing a pet from a friend or family member can be a great way to have a practice run. You can have their pet for a day or a few days so you and your child understand the responsibility of caring for a pet. Obviously, some pets are easier to “borrow” than others. A dog will often be happier to spend time with another family than a cat will. You could offer to pet-sit while someone you know is away if you’re looking for a way to trial pet ownership.

Teach How to Behave Around a Pet:

Children need to be able to behave well around a pet to keep both them and the animal safe. Even when they have been taught how to handle an animal, they should still be supervised. It’s crucial to teach your child important things like how to recognize when a pet wants to be left alone, how to pet them gently, and how to avoid upsetting an animal with their behavior. You can do this by talking to them, demonstrating, reading books, or watching videos.

Getting a pet isn’t something you should do lightly. If your child is asking for a pet, make sure you don’t rush into it and get a lot of practice beforehand.

Featured Image By: Pexels

No Horsing Around: Why You Need To Think Seriously Before Buying A Horse

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No Horsing Around: Why You Need To Think Seriously Before Buying A Horse

I feel like every child has a phase where they are just obsessed with horses. I wouldn’t say I was ever completely crazy about them but that changed when I got the opportunity to help kids with developmental disabilities ride horses at a ranch that I live by. Being able to work alongside the children and animals and seeing them connect with each other so much was incredibly beautiful to me. Ever since, horses have been alright in my book and I was lucky enough to go horse back riding in Asheville when I visited in June and September. Such fun!
Do I plan on buying myself a pony in the near future? No. But the people who are should be aware of what they are getting themselves into, like you would do with any pet!

        No Horsing Around: Why You Need To Think Seriously Before Buying A Horse:

The equestrian world is certainly a beautiful thing to be a part of. The lifestyle and sport is one of athleticism, adventure, and competition. But it’s also one that is plenty of hard work and can take up a lot of time. Even as a real horse lover and someone who rides all the time, you still have to think seriously before buying a horse. A horse is a long-term investment and a serious commitment. So here are some things to think about before taking the leap.

Time: Owning and looking after a horse requires a lot of time, money, and early starts. Of course, it’s full of enjoyment too, but do remember it is a time-consuming job that requires care every day. Do you have the time to commit to it on top of regular household chores and family, too? If you want some advice on time saving tips in the home, follow the click. They may just help you free up more time to spend at the stables!

Money: Horses are not only expensive to buy but also cost a lot in upkeep. There will be vet bills, shoeing costs, livery charges, and food and forage to think about. Stabled horses need hay all year round as well as bedding. Horses also require insurance, medications, and new shoes roughly every six weeks. You also need to consider their dentistry bills and a contingency fund for any emergencies that may occur. It’s a pretty big money commitment!

Home: You may be lucky enough to be able to house your horse at home. But most horse owners aren’t. If not, you will have to consider the cost of livery stables or invest in buying an internal stable or mobile field shelter. This will all require a lot of research to find the ideal one. Companies such as Vale Stables are a good place to start if you are looking for a quality equine housing solution.

Testing The Waters: If you are unsure if you have the time to commit to owning a horse a good option may be to lease one out for six months. This will give you an opportunity to see if you are up for the job. You can often get full or partial leases on horses. This arrangement means that you either pay a fixed fee or you pay for some of the expenses that go towards looking after the horse. In exchange for payment, you get free riding time on the horse. If you have a riding school or you work with an instructor ask for their advice. Many stables often have leases available, and she/he may know someone trustworthy and reputable.

Let’s Talk Budget: If you do go ahead with buying a horse, there are still lots of things to consider. First, you will need to know what budget you need. Of course, this will depend on what type of competitive level you want to reach. If you want to own a horse to love and go out on adventures with and perhaps compete in small local events, you should look at a budget of about $5,000. If you want a horse that you can use at higher competitive levels, you should talk to your trainer or instructor to find out what they suggest is an expected price. Temperament is also the most fundamental aspect of buying a horse. Buy one who is well-mannered, kind, calm, and gentle, and you will have a friend for life.

What was your dream pet as a child? What animal did you have an irrational fear of when you were little (my brother was afraid of penguins!)? I want to hear from all of you, so leave me a comment and let’s chat! Much love. -Sarah

Featured Image By: Unsplash