The Coronavirus Pandemic & Mental Health

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The Coronavirus Pandemic & Mental Health

Mental health has always been a sensitive topic. It’s equally important to physical health, but many believe otherwise. Mental health problems include anxiety, depression, insomnia, and phobias of different kinds. Earlier, people ignored these problems, but now, we know better.

Due to strong efforts by many mental health experts, the world became aware of these conditions and saw their effect on children, teenagers, and adults alike. But the number of patients shot up drastically during the pandemic.

How did the pandemic effect mental health?

People lost their loved ones to Covid, which worsened mental health across the globe. Every day felt worse than the last and it felt impossible to visit our friends and family. Everybody was scared for their lives, and fear is not good for mental health.

Companies laid off people, which increased unemployment and caused worry. Lock downs shut down schools, children were forced to stay home, work from home became a norm, and people had to live in isolation, leading to many mental health problems.

The whole situation created immense pressure in the minds of adults and children. It’s hard to recover from the tragedy of this scale. The environment of uncertainty and danger created hopelessness that’s hard to manage. All of these problems trigger mental issues such as anxiety and depression.

Are young adults depressed?

Surveys have shown that young people are more prone to mental issues due to the pandemic. According to a study of healthcare students at the University of Jordan, it is found that students are suffering from high anxiety, which can also hinder their learning abilities.

Young adults have reported a lack of sleep and a rise in negative thoughts. They crave losing masks and attending events like they were supposed to at this age. The constant fear is always there. What if this never ends? The financial risks are also to note. Colleges might be closed, making it hard for students to study and get good grades to qualify for better courses or jobs. They lack the skills taught inside colleges to make them excel in their respective fields.

Many studies point towards a global mental health crisis due to the pandemic. Young adults are prone to mental health problems like stress and anxiety. Loneliness during the pandemic has made young adults susceptible to depression.

What to do now?

Now that things are looking up, we all must work hard to get our mental health on track. Find people who face similar issues as you and talk to them. Create groups where you and your peers can share their struggles during the pandemic and afterward. Form pacts to put in efforts towards the betterment of your mental health.

These include eating healthy and exercising regularly. You can even hire a trainer who has done an offline or online PT course so that he or she is equipped with the knowledge to help you work out. Having a personal trainer allows you to learn how to get the best out of each workout session. They also suggest diets and healthy habits curb negative thoughts and promote better sleep.

Mental health issues need treatment and professional care. Schools and colleges can hire therapists to take care of students and listen to their struggles. They can also conduct group sessions with professionals to solve problems on a larger scale.

There is also nothing wrong with using medications when necessary. Severe levels of depression need selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or selective serotonin or norepinephrine inhibitors. Tetracyclic antidepressants are also recommended for depression along with bupropion. Organizations, schools, and colleges can have clinical psychologists prescribe medications.

It has always been important to take care of your mental health but even more so when living in these scary times. Be good to yourself and brighter days are ahead soon!

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