5 Tips For When You’re Worried a Friend Has a Mental Illness

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5 Tips For When You’re Worried a Friend Has a Mental Illness

It is, unfortunately, just a fact of life that so many people are suffering from mental conditions. These problems can affect people from all backgrounds and demographics. You really can’t know who is suffering and who’s not just by looking at what they have or how much money they earn. If Prince Harry of England can suffer from mental health issues, then anybody can. When it’s your close friend or partner, sudden changes in their mood and outlook on life can be glaringly obvious to you. Here are five tips for handling that situation, should it arise (we hope it doesn’t!):

Talk It Out:

People have a hard time opening up about mental health problems, which is one of the problems in the first place! So it’s unlikely that your friend is just going to spill every single detail about what’s going on inside their mind, especially if they like to put on a front that everything is all good. If you suspect that something’s up, have a conversation with them. A real one. They might just have a small issue that they just need someone to listen to. If it’s more serious than that, then you can take it further.

Give Positive Energy:

If a friend is suffering from something that’s not nice to deal with, then they will obviously be in a dark place. While it’s not easy to be your bright and cheerful self around someone incapable of matching your enthusiasm, it’s important that you bring all of the positive energy you can muster when you’re around them. This doesn’t mean being loud and suggesting a wacky adventure every time you’re with them; it means being calm, thoughtful, positive, and suggesting activities that might boost their mood. It won’t be easy, so patience is definitely a virtue.

Encourage Them To Get Help:

Sometimes, a friend will be suffering from problems much more threatening than mild depression, for instance. It might be that they need to get professional help. Unfortunately, they might not go down this path if they haven’t accepted that anything’s wrong. When that happens, help them see for themselves that something isn’t right. If you suspect your friend is suffering from schizophrenia, have them take a self-screening test from schizlife.com here. When they don’t feel attacked and can be honest with themselves, they might be more willing to seek professional help for their problems.

Don’t Get Too Close:

While it’s important that you do everything that you can to make sure your friend is okay, you should avoid getting too close to the situation. This is especially relevant if the friend is your boyfriend or girlfriend. It’s important that you keep a healthy distance, for their sake as well as your own, as sometimes your own mental health can suffer when looking after their other half. Make sure that you take care of you, too.

You’re There For Them:

Above all, make sure they know that you’ll always be there for them. Some people’s conditions flare up, and they need to know someone is there for emotional support. If you let them know that you are available, night or day, then they’ll have an extra dose of comfort knowing that they’re not alone in the world.

Mental health issues can be scary, and as a friend or partner it is your duty to show support to a loved one who is struggling. Life is not always sunshine and rainbows, but you can definitely try and help it to be!

Featured Image By: Pexels

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4 responses »

  1. Pingback: Improving Your Emotional Well-Being, Starting With You | lifewithlilred

  2. Pingback: Everyday Inspiration #19 – Blogging University

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