When Can You Say That You’ve ‘Made It’?

Standard
When Can You Say That You’ve ‘Made It’?

Perhaps the easiest thing in the world to do is compare yourself to other people. As children, we learn this technique to help us understand our place in the social hierarchy, for better or worse. As we get older and compare our grades to other children or our siblings, we continually find out if we’re ‘good enough’ or where we’re lagging behind.

This can translate into adulthood, where the means of our livelihood or how much money we pull in each year can be somewhat intrusive areas of discussion at the Christmas work party or family barbecue. But when can you say that you’ve ‘made it’? We often use this term to express artists that now have enough listeners to guarantee material success, but should we really limit ourselves to this description?

In the following post, we hope to widen the parameters through which you may give yourself the real credit of ‘making it’, allowing us to think along healthier and more considered lines. Please, consider:

A Home You Love:

When occupying a home you love, you have one of the most vital and beautiful possessions anyone could hope for – no matter if you rent or use a mortgage to gain said property. A home you love can be a vital part of your personality, help you raise a family, or schedule the best social events within, and generally give you the room to be your most authentic self. General contractors can help you express your creative interests and tastes over the years, and that in itself gives you the opportunity to design to your hearts content. If you have this, no matter if you live alone or own a property in which you keep roommates or a humble family setup, you have something to be proud of.

Connections You Care About:

It’s very easy for us to mark ourselves as only successful when affluent, or able to define our material success this way. But really, the people we know, the loving connections we adopt, the closeness to our family, the genuine experiences we share with our friends – these are the things that count. It’s possible for someone living on a shoestring budget to enjoy and curate the closest relationships around them, while it’s also possible for someone within a beautiful, million-dollar home to feel completely isolated from those they are supposed to call friends. This realization can help you adjust your priorities accordingly.

Curating Your Interests:

Curating your interests is something that can seem so simple and basic. We’re all supposed to have hobbies. But more than simply watching something on Netflix or playing a video game (which are more than justified methods of relaxing and taking some stress off), curating a real interest can help bring you an incredible amount of joy over the years. It might be reading into a subject, learning a craft, or cooking well and eating a wide array of cuisines. We take interests for granted, but really, we should appreciate them as additional pursuits that give our life value. If you have a few of these to curate, you are truly a lucky individual.

With this advice, we hope you can see the conventional idea of ‘making it’ is only worthwhile when contributing to a healthy, humble life!

Featured Image By: Pexels

6 responses »

Leave me a comment and let's chat!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s